Mayoral Candidates: Winnipeg Without Poverty 2018 Questionnaire Responses

Mayoral Candidates

Candidates: Umar Hayat, Doug Wilson, Don Woodstock, Jenny Motkaluk, Ed Ackerman, Brian Bowman, Tim Diack, Venkat Machiraju

  1. Will you be a champion for a Winnipeg Without Poverty and commit to leading the development of a comprehensive poverty reduction plan for Winnipeg with progress indicators that have targets and timelines?

Umar Hayat:

No response.

Doug Wilson:

No response.

Don Woodstock:

A meaningful plan is exactly what this issue needs.  Objectives and Timelines will be implemented if there is to be success.

Jenny Motkaluk:

No response.

Ed Ackerman:

No response.

Brian Bowman:

I support Make Poverty History Manitoba’s goals and am committed to working with community

organizations to reduce poverty in our city and improve the lives of all Winnipeggers. I acknowledge that poverty is complex and that poverty reduction can be effective only when all levels of government as well as community stakeholders work collaboratively and in a coordinated fashion. The City of Winnipeg, given its jurisdictional and fiscal limitations, cannot reduce poverty alone.

Tim Diack:

I’m a beat cop in Point Douglas. I have dealt with poverty and everything else that a city can produce.

Venkat Machiraju:

No response.

 

  1. What specific actions will you take to reduce poverty in Winnipeg via the City of Winnipeg?

Umar Hayat:

No response.

Doug Wilson:

No response.

Don Woodstock:

We will cut off all Corporate Welfare (giving to a bunch of millionaires that do not need our money), and invest heavily into the core communities through A) a Housing First strategy and B) investing into recreational facilities/programs/activities such as arts, music, sports – keeping the youth engaged and out of trouble. Sports Capital not crime capital.

Jenny Motkaluk:

No response.

Ed Ackerman:

No response.

Brian Bowman:

The City of Winnipeg already tackles poverty on many fronts, including grant funding for

numerous community organizations as well as the Winnipeg Housing Rehabilitation Corporation, and a Fee Subsidy Program for recreation and leisure for families falling below the Low Income Cut Off, all of which I continue to support.

During my term in office, I established the Winnipeg Promise Initiative to encourage greater access to post-secondary participation among low-income families; facilitated, along with End Homelessness Winnipeg and the Downtown Winnipeg BIZ, the creation of an Unsafe Panhandling Steering Committee made up of numerous stakeholders, including those with lived experience, to connect panhandlers to a continuum of services and employment opportunities; and recently supported a pilot project that will see Mother Earth Recycling divert discarded mattresses and spring boxes from the landfill and employ individuals with multiple barriers to employment.

But there is still more we can do. I supported a motion at a June Executive Policy Committee meeting directing the Public Service to present options and recommendations on specific measures to further reduce poverty in Winnipeg within existing budgets. I also supported a motion at a July Executive Policy Committee meeting directing the Public Service to present options and recommendations on a new low income bus pass program for consideration in the 2019 Budget.

Moreover, I am committed to have the City of Winnipeg continue funding End Homelessness Winnipeg. It is equally worth noting that I have endorsed in principle Main Street Project’s shelter redevelopment plan at the former Mitchell Fabrics building. Finally, CentreVenture is currently accepting Expressions of Interest from non-profit housing developers to build affordable units at Market Lands where the former PSB and civic parkade stand.

Tim Diack:

I have put some ideas up on diackformayor.ca and I am the only one putting in writing to have a proper breakfast program in schools. Truancy is a big problem in my area.

Venkat Machiraju:

No response.

 

  1. How will you work with community groups and people with lived experience of poverty?

Umar Hayat:

No response.

Doug Wilson:

No response.

Don Woodstock:

First thing I will do is have a ‘listening ear’ and instead of hiring ‘outside consultants’ who will tell them what to do, I will empower the people living in the community by putting them in charge.

Jenny Motkaluk:

No response.

Ed Ackerman:

No response.

Brian Bowman:

I will continue to engage and work collaboratively with community stakeholders, including those with lived experience, to further find ways to reduce poverty.

Tim Diack:

I’m not going to knock any other candidate, but watch my direct answers and first hand experience. Use that to judge who will serve the people of Winnipeg best.

Venkat Machiraju:

No response.

 

  1. Anything further to add?

Don Woodstock:

The community needs to stop voting for politicians that only ‘talk’ and make empty promises.  I have lived in the West End/North End for more than 8 years, and all I see are people drawing political lines, supporting candidates that do absolutely nothing to rid our city of issues.  It is cheaper to put people in a home and provide services for them than to leave folks on the street. I want Winnipeg to be the 8th city in Canada to end homelessness. The lack of housing, mental health, drugs, crime, poverty – all intertwine.  We have to start investing into the core communities. When the core is healthy – the rest of society will be healthy. Just like your heart – if it is healthy then the rest of your body will be. A paradigm shift is needed.

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